Milos Seascapes

Last week I was fortunate to visit the Greek island of Milos for a mini-vacation, where I got the chance to drive around and sample everything this beautiful island has to offer. Being part of the Cyclades, Milos was one of the many Aegean islands formed from the catastrophic eruption of the volcano in Santorini. Its volcanic nature therefore, makes it the home of stunning multi-coloured rock formations and beautiful seascapes.

On the first day of our arrival, we ran into some bad weather. The photographic instinct in me however, saw an excellent opportunity to head down to the beach for a couple of shots. The picture below is from the beach of Sarakiniko, on the north shore of the island. As I was exploring the lunar-like landscape of this particular beach for a photo opportunity, I accidentally stumbled onto this amazing sight. I immediately set up my tripod and screwed on my 10-stop ND filter, in an effort to slow down my shutter speed and capture the motion of both the waves and clouds. The strong winds made the task harder, as I had to firmly hold down the tripod to avoid any camera shake.

Sarakiniko Rock - 1920c

Shot with my tripod mounted Canon 60D and my Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 DC HSM lens, at ISO 100, F10, at 6 secs, with a B+W ND3.0 filter.


Ngapali Sunset

For a while now I’ve been itching to take a seascape shot at sunset, but never got around to it. I finally found the opportunity 2 weeks ago when I was on a business trip in Ngapali – a beach town on the west coast of Burma. Hearing prior to my trip that this location has one of the best beaches in the South East Asia region, I had my hopes high and thankfully I was not disappointed.

I generally try to travel light, but one of the compromises I never make is taking my trusty travel tripod – a key ingredient for this type of shots. Equally as key (though not 100% necessary), is a set of Neutral Density (ND) filters. For this shot I used a 3-stop solid ND filter to slow down my shutter speed, as well as a 2-stop ND grad filter to equalize the brightness of the sky with the foreground.

I arrived to take this shot about 20 minutes before sunset. As I was setting up my equipment knee-high in water, a young Burmese boy approached me and silently stood by, curious about what I was doing. I attempted to explain to him that I was taking a picture of the scenery but the response I got was a simple nod before he started pointing out the fish swimming in the water. He must have thought that my tripod was a fancy spear gun. I smiled in return knowing that it was all lost in translation.

Ngapali Sunset - 1920c

Shot with my Canon 60D and Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 DC HSM lens, at ISO 100, F22, 0.6secs, w/ 0.9 solid ND and 0.6 ND grad filters.